Thought: ‘The finest mansions are built from little lumps of burned-up clay and swipes of sloppy mortar.’

Addictions UK uses Twitter to share inspirational Thoughts every day. This article is based on one of them. Follow us at @addictionsuk.

illustrationWhen it comes down it, hardly anything that we admire starts off in the form we now see it.

The most beautiful diamond ring starts off as dirty, rough stones with no sparkle at all. The finest paintings begin as squirts of greasy pigment.

Even in nature, the most beautiful flowers spring from uninspiring seeds.

So it’s important for all of us to focus on potential, on the goal, not the starting point.

Addiction to alcohol, drugs or anything else spoils lives, reducing relationships and lifestyles to a mess. But time and again experience teaches us that there is still potential in the unlovely.

So although you may look at your own life and think there is not much in it to celebrate, be sure that it is full of possibilities. Everyone has potential waiting to be released, be it through the development of talents or the restoration of relationships.

With a little help, anyone can rediscover and release the possibilities, however hidden and unlikely they may seem.

Please contact us now if you need help with recovery from any addiction and especially if you are seeking home-based treatment.

Thought: Ending the conflict with someone else puts an end to conflict within yourself.

Addictions UK uses Twitter to share inspirational Thoughts every day. This article is based on one of them. Follow us at @addictionsuk.

illustrationHowever hard we pretend otherwise, disagreements and disputes are always painful.

We may be sure we are in the right. More often, truthfully, we doubt it and that may make us more defensive and obstinate.

No-one wants to lose face or be made to climb down.

But the damage that conflicts do is never one-sided.

Finding a way to make peace with the other person allows us to find peace within ourselves.

Most disagreements can be resolved without a mediator – and a good thing too because there is nothing more dangerous than than being drawn into someone else’s argument. But sometimes it is really is necessary to get help to iron out the difficulties and end the dispute.

The longer a conflict drags on, the more difficult it is to resolve. Seek a solution as soon as you can.

It really is in your own best interest because finding peace with someone else is sure to bring peace within yourself.

Please contact us now if you need help with recovery from any addiction and especially if you are seeking home-based treatment.

Thought: “Why ever did I do that?” should never be left as a rhetorical question.

Addictions UK uses Twitter to share inspirational Thoughts every day. This article is based on one of them. Follow us at @addictionsuk.

illustrationToo much introspection is a dangerous self indulgence but it’s equally dangerous to blinded by denial.

We all do things that we later regret. Sometimes it’s easy to see what happened. We were overtired or under pressure. We simply over-reacted. But sometimes, on reflection, our own behaviour seems quite inexplicable.

The greater the consequences, real or potential, the more important is that we do not simply shrug it off. If what happened put us or others in a bad place then it’s essential we analyse what happened and find strategies for avoiding a recurrence.

If the process is confusing or frightening or just too hard then we may need help. Maybe it’s something to discuss with family or a friend or a mentor.

Perhaps the most important part of reviewing the events is the opportunity to consider if an apology or some repair or restitution is required.

If you find yourself thinking “Whyever did I do that?” then answer the question!

Please
contact us now if you need help with recovery from any addiction and especially if you are seeking home-based treatment.

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Addictions UK regularly posts items of interest to our Facebook Page. Most of these are links to on-line news from sources all over the world. Though they may be published from all sorts of locations, they all focus on developments in the experience and treatment of addiction or else reflect worthy or challenging opinions.

We think this stream of articles will interest all those in recovery and all involved in the treatment of addicts and that the variety of topics means that everyone will find something relevant quite often. Check it out at http://www.facebook.com/AddictionsUK The page also regularly offers inspirational and encouraging thoughts and quotations to motivate and inspire.

Among the topics that journalists and bloggers raise, two seem to crop up more than others; one concerns the nature and definition of “addiction” and the other reviews the arguments about whether abstinence is essential to recovery.

On the latter, the position of Addictions UK is quite clear. Along with all those who believe that the Twelve Step path is the best route to recovery, we hold that there is no alternative to total abstinence from the substance or habit that has taken over someone’s life. Although turning away unequivocally from the addiction itself is not actually one of The Steps, it seems the inevitable result of admitting we are powerless over alcohol or drugs or gambling or whatever. If so, then total abstinence provides the only context in which the path to recovery can be followed.

That is probably the widely held view, but there are a few who disagree, arguing that it is possible to control and manage an addiction and that “a little of what you fancy” does not always mean total loss of control. It would be disingenuous to pretend that this point of view does not exist and our Facebook page links to its airing now and then. We think that the case for total abstinence is so strong that reviewing any challenge to it can only confirm its validity.

Less clear-cut is the argument about what constitutes “an addiction”. No-one doubts the power of alcohol, drugs, gambling, or pornography to ruin someone’s life. In each case there is point at which indulgence turns to addiction. However, if the line is not precise in any of those cases, then it is much more fuzzy in others. When, if ever, does over-eating become food addiction? Is there such as thing as “exercise addiction”?

When we share articles that ask such questions, we hope that they encourage readers to think again about the wider issues and reconsider and redefine their understanding. Taking a fresh look is not always easy but is almost always beneficial.

So please follow our page at http://www.facebook.com/AddictionsUK and learn from what we share. Pass it on and don’t be shy to add your reaction and opinions.