Thought: People make mistakes – that’s why pencils come with erasers on the end.

Addictions UK uses Twitter to share inspirational Thoughts every day. This article is based on one of them.

Being wrong is easy – the hard part is admitting it. Much of the emphasis of the Twelve Steps is on the need to face up to problems, not least those we have created for ourselves. We are challenged to admit that we are powerless over addiction, that our lives have become unmanageable, that we have defects of character and have wronged people.

But, if we are not careful, we can be overwhelmed by the negativity and sense of guilt.

There are two important things to remember. One is that we are not alone in making mistakes and the other is that everything can be made better.

Everyone fails in all sorts of ways and with awful frequency. It is part of being human. All religious teachers recognise this and challenge people to recognise both their weakness and that there is a source of strength available to them.

Jesus, as one example, while telling his followers that they must be perfect like their Father in heaven, never failed in his openness, understanding and forgiveness for those who fell short of that ideal – and that means everyone.

You don’t need to be “religious” to recognise that you are not what you could be. Whether God or Chance gave you the opportunities, you have not made the most of them.

At one and the same time you need to accept that imperfection is normal but never to use that as an excuse for giving up on the goal. There is help available – from your faith, your friends and your family.

Similarly, the fact that some damage can never be repaired is never a reason to give up trying to make things better. In the most extreme example, a murderer cannot bring his victim back to life but he can help to repair other lives and, in so doing, redeem his own.

To err is human – everyone makes mistakes. Never see yourself as different from the rest nor give in to the prideful fantasy that you are the worst of all. And never imagine that you cannot be better. The only barrier to success is the fear of failure.

Follow us at @addictionsuk. Please contact us now if you need help with recovery from any addiction and especially if you are seeking home-based treatment.

Thought: Better to succeed at conquering just one defect at a time than to fail to correct everything at once.

Addictions UK uses Twitter to share inspirational Thoughts every day. This article is based on one of them.

The road to hell is paved with good intentions. It has a fast lane on which you can get there quicker by trying to do too much too soon.

It’s a temptation we all face whenever things are wrong. The perceived urgency to change everything dramatically and quickly is almost irresistible.

And so we rush in headlong, desperate to escape the bad state that things are in and to enjoy a better life in every way.

But, in truth, we are well aware of the twin pitfalls which turn our desperation into a race to disaster.

For one thing “to fail to plan is to plan to fail”. If we don’t take time to assess the risks and prepare contingencies then it’s going to go wrong. Unforeseen difficulties may overwhelm us, choices informed only by ignorance may tear us away from success and rushed repairs will fall apart.

The other obvious danger is that our ambition will outstrip our abilities. By trying to do do much at once we may fail to achieve anything at all.

The Twelve Steps encourage us not only to to admit that we are powerless over our addiction but also to recognise that we need help to recover. And so with the guide of a mentor and the support of our friends and family we need a plan for manageable progress. The fearless inventory, the recognition of wrongs and the determination to amend defects of character shows us the way forward but, as in every aspect of our progress, we need to proceed a step at a time, setting and achieving realistic goals.

Better to take a successful step than a great leap into failure.

Follow us at @addictionsuk. Please contact us now if you need help with recovery from any addiction and especially if you are seeking home-based treatment.

(This week’s slogan)

It’s easy to condemn others, especially when it diverts attention from our own failings. But if what they do is not illegal or universally acknowledged to be immoral, do we really have the right to judge people?

Addictions UK

Contact us now on line

or telephone 0300 330 30 40.

You are just a phone call away from addiction recovery.

Thought: A problem shared is two problems halved

Addictions UK uses Twitter to share inspirational Thoughts every day. This article is based on one of them. Follow us at @addictionsuk.

“A problem shared is a problem halved.” It’s an old saying and a true one, provided you choose the right confidant. Knowing that someone else knows and understands brings a sense of relief and support. You are no longer alone in your troubles and whatever your problem is, you are still accepted.

Every recovering addict knows about the importance of mutual support for relapse prevention.

But it can go further than that.

In the right circumstances and with the right person (and that’s really important), the exchange of mutual support brings additional advantages. The recipient always benefits from care and encouragement and if there is an exchange of both then both are better off.

If you share similar problems then the sense that you are not alone and someone else really understands what you are facing is empowering.

And when you ask someone else for help it boosts their self esteem.

So for both the people involved, helping one another is both supportive and affirming.

It really can be true that “a problem shared is two problems halved”, and maybe even more.

Please contact us now if you need help with recovery from any addiction and especially if you are seeking home-based treatment.

(This week’s slogan)

Are you really so much in control of your own life and destiny that you have time (or the right) to try to control other people?

Addictions UK

Contact us now on line

or telephone 0300 330 30 40.

You are just a phone call away from addiction recovery.

Thought: ‘When your life is in pieces there are pieces to pick up.’

Addictions UK uses Twitter to share inspirational Thoughts every day. This article is based on one of them. Follow us at @addictionsuk.

Depression is a horrible affliction, whether it is brought on by particular events or is a chronic condition. Although, in reality, things may not be as bad as they seem, being told that is worse than unhelpful as it just adds to the isolating feeling that no-one understands.

The truth is, however, that there always is a way forward. Whatever has happened to destroy your happiness or health or security or confidence, you are the same person you have always been and what you have learned and achieved throughout your life has not been wiped away.

Somewhere in the darkness are the remains of possibilities and when you find them you can begin to rebuild them.

As so often, the smallest steps are often the most successful and empowering.

Helping a child complete homework becomes a tiny reminder of the mental power and potential still within you. More importantly, perhaps, it recalls and reveals the possibilities within relationships.

The smallest, day one, basic beginner’s task at work can become the reminder of a career of experience and achievement.

Progress, be it almost insignificant, holds out hope.

Seeing what we once were is not only about how far we have fallen but also about what we could be again.

The tiniest viable fragment of a life in pieces, once found, can show us the possibilities for recovery and the need to accept help.

“The only way is up”.

If you would like help picking up the pieces of your life, contact Addictions UK now, especially if you are seeking home-based treatment for alcohol or other addictions.

(This week’s slogan)

Whether you are building a recovery or anything else, you can’t fix pretty tiles to the roof before you have put up the walls.

Addictions UK

Contact us now on line

or telephone 0300 330 30 40.

You are just a phone call away from addiction recovery.